×

COVID-19: Auckland and parts of the Waikato region are at Alert Level 3. The rest of New Zealand is at Alert Level 2. Find information about consumer impacts during COVID-19 alert levels.

Students reflect on their learning and take action to deepen their understandings and increase community awareness of consumer rights and responsibilities.

In this module students reflect on their learning and take action to deepen their understandings and increase community awareness of consumer rights and responsibilities.

1. So what?

Students complete the So What? Now What? Chart to reflect on their learning and set personal goals for themselves as consumers.

So what? Now What? Chart [PDF, 586 KB]

2. Taking action

Students consider ways they can deepen their learning and increase community awareness of consumer rights and responsibilities. The class might decide on one collective action or students could work in groups on a range of actions. This table includes some possible actions. However this phase of the unit will be most effective when it is driven by students’ interests and needs.

Possible actions

Buy classroom toys for wet days: Students could fundraise or bring a gold-coin donation to school to purchase classroom toys and games to use on wet-weather days.

Whānau day: Students could host a whānau day where they invite their families to school to share their learning about being a confident and informed consumer. Students could share information through role plays, slideshows, songs, or posters, or they could organise a series of information stations that parents and family members visit in rotation.

Spread the word: Students could create a poster, pamphlet, or video to spread messages about consumer protection.

Second-hand toy sale: Students could organise a school-wide, second-hand toy sale to recycle old toys and reduce waste.

Newsletter tips: Students could write weekly consumer tips in the school newsletter to share their learning about being confident and informed consumers with the wider school community.

Donate a toy or game: Students could fundraise to purchase toys or games for children in need. They might choose to donate the new toys and games to the local Salvation Army, children’s hospital, or women’s refuge.

Social action: Students could take appropriate action against a real-life consumer problem, such as a misleading advertisement or scam.

Appendices